GOES Product Inventory



App Collection:

Alphabetic list of products:
  1. CLAVR-x Cloud Depth
    ID: CloudDepth-CLAVRX
    CloudDepth-CLAVRX
  2. CLAVR-x Cloud Effective Radius
    ID: CloudReff-CLAVRX
    CloudReff-CLAVRX
  3. CLAVR-x Cloud Top Height
    ID: CloudHght-CLAVRX
    CloudHght-CLAVRX
  4. CLAVR-x Cloud Top Pressure
    ID: CloudPres-CLAVRX
    CloudPres-CLAVRX
  5. CLAVR-x Cloud Top Temperature
    ID: CloudTemp-CLAVRX
    CloudTemp-CLAVRX
  6. Eclipse Path
    ID: Eclipse
    Eclipse Path
  7. GOES CAPE
    ID: cimssdpicapeli
    CIMSS-DPI Convective Available Potential Energy (Li et al. 2008)
  8. GOES Cloud Phase
    ID: FLSgeocphase
    FLS: GOES Cloud Phase
  9. GOES Cloud Thickness
    ID: FLSgeocthick
    FLS: GOES Cloud Thickness
  10. GOES East ABI ConUS B01 "Blue" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND01
    The 0.47 µm, or “Blue” visible band, is one of two visible bands on the ABI, and provides data for monitoring aerosols. Included on NASA’s MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS instruments, this band provides well-established benefits. The geostationary ABI 0.47 µm band will provide nearly continuous daytime observations of dust, haze, smoke and clouds. The 0.47 µm band is more sensitive to aerosols / dust / smoke because it samples a part of the electromagnetic spectrum where clear-sky atmospheric scattering is important
  11. GOES East ABI ConUS B02 Hi-Res "Red" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND02
    The ‘Red’ Visible band – 0.64 µm – has the finest spatial resolution (0.5 km at the subsatellite point) of all ABI bands. Thus it is ideal to identify small-scale features such as river fogs and fog/clear air boundaries, or overshooting tops or cumulus clouds. It has also been used to document daytime snow and ice cover, diagnose low-level cloud-drift winds, assist with detection of volcanic ash and analysis of hurricanes and winter storms. The ‘Red’ Visible band is also essential for creation of “true color” imagery.
  12. GOES East ABI ConUS B03 "Veggie"
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND03
    The 0.86 μm band (a reflective band) detects daytime clouds, fog, and aerosols and is used to compute the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Its nickname is the “veggie” or “vegetation” band. The 0.86 μm band can detect burn scars and thereby show land characteristics to determine fire and run-off potential. Vegetated land, in general, shows up brighter in this band than in visible bands. Landwater contrast is also large in this band.
  13. GOES East ABI ConUS B04 Cirrus
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND04
    The Cirrus Band (1.37 µm) is unique among the reflective bands on the ABI in that it occupies a region of very strong absorption by water vapor in the electromagnetic spectrum. It will detect very thin cirrus clouds during the day.
  14. GOES East ABI ConUS B05 Snow/Ice
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND05
    The Snow/Ice band takes advantage of the difference between the refraction components of water and ice at 1.61 µm. Liquid water clouds are bright in this channel; ice clouds are darker because ice absorbs (rather than reflects) radiation at 1.61 µm. Thus you can infer cloud phase. Fires can also be detected at night using this band.
  15. GOES East ABI ConUS B06 Cloud Particle Size
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND06
    The 2.24 μm band, in conjunction with other bands, enables cloud particle size estimation. Cloud particle size changes can indicate cloud development. The 2.24 μm band is also used with other bands to estimate aerosol particle size (by characterizing the aerosol-free background over land), to create cloud masking and to detect hot spots.
  16. GOES East ABI ConUS B07 "Fire"
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND07
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  17. GOES East ABI ConUS B07 "Fire" enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND07-FIRE
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  18. GOES East ABI ConUS B07 "Fire" stretch
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND07D
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  19. GOES East ABI ConUS B08 Upper-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND08
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  20. GOES East ABI ConUS B08 Upper-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND08-VAPR
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  21. GOES East ABI ConUS B09 Mid-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND09
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  22. GOES East ABI ConUS B09 Mid-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND09-VAPR
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  23. GOES East ABI ConUS B10 Lower-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND10
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  24. GOES East ABI ConUS B10 Lower-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND10-VAPR
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  25. GOES East ABI ConUS B11 Cloud Phase
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND11
    The infrared 8.5 μm band is a window channel; there is little atmospheric absorption of energy in clear skies at this wavelength (unless SO2 from a volcanic eruption is present). However, knowledge of emissivity is important in the interpretation of this Band: Differences in surface emissivity at 8.5 μm occur over different soil types, affecting the perceived brightness temperature. Water droplets also have different emissivity properties for 8.5 μm radiation compared to other wavelengths. The 8.5 μm band was not available on either the Legacy GOES Imager or GOES Sounder.
  26. GOES East ABI ConUS B12 Ozone
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND12
    The 9.6 μm band gives information both day and night about the dynamics of the atmosphere near the tropopause. This band shows cooler temperatures than the clean window band because both ozone and water vapor absorb 9.6 μm atmospheric energy. The cooling effect is especially apparent at large zenith angles. This band alone cannot diagnose total column ozone: product generation using other bands will be necessary for that.
  27. GOES East ABI ConUS B13 "Clean" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND13
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  28. GOES East ABI ConUS B13 "Clean" Infrared enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND13-GRAD
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  29. GOES East ABI ConUS B14 Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND14
    The infrared 11.2 μm band is a window channel; however, there is absorption of energy by water vapor at this wavelength. Brightness Temperatures (BTs) are affected by this absorption, and 11.2 μm BTs will be cooler than clean window (10.3 μm) BTs – by an amount that is a function of the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. This band has similarities to the legacy infrared channel at 10.7 μm.
  30. GOES East ABI ConUS B15 "Dirty" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND15
    Absorption and re-emission of water vapor, particularly in the lower troposphere, slightly cools most non-cloud brightness temperatures (BTs) in the 12.3 μm band compared to the other infrared window channels: the more water vapor, the greater the BT difference. The 12.3 μm band and the 10.3 μm are used to compute the ‘split window difference’. The 10.3 μm “Clean Window” channel is a better choice than the “Dirty Window” (12.3 μm) for the monitoring of simple atmospheric phenomena.
  31. GOES East ABI ConUS B16 Carbon Dioxide
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-BAND16
    Products derived using the infrared 13.3 μm “Carbon Dioxide” band can be used to delineate the tropopause, to estimate cloudtop heights, to discern the level of Derived Motion Winds, to supplement Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) sky observations and to identify Volcanic Ash. The 13.3 μm band is vital for Baseline Products; that is demonstrated by its presence on heritage GOES Imagers and Sounders. Despite its importance in products, the CO2 channel is typically not used for visual interpretation of weather events.
  32. GOES East ABI ConUS True Color product
    ID: G16-ABI-CONUS-TC
    True Color Imagery gives an image that is approximately as you would see it from Outer Space. With ABI, the challenge of creating True Color arises from the the lack of a Green Band. The CIMSS Natural True Color product, approximates the green by combining Blue (0.47 µm), Red (0.64 µm) and ‘Veggie’ (0.86 µm) bands. The use of the Veggie band is important because it mimics the enhanced reflectivity present in the Green Band.
  33. GOES East ABI Full Disk "Sandwich" (corrected)
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-corrected
    G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-corrected
  34. GOES East ABI Full Disk "Sandwich" (merge)
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-merge
    G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-merge
  35. GOES East ABI Full Disk "Sandwich" (not corrected)
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-notcorrected
    G16-ABI-FD-Sandwich-notcorrected
  36. GOES East ABI Full Disk B01 "Blue" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND01
    The 0.47 µm, or “Blue” visible band, is one of two visible bands on the ABI, and provides data for monitoring aerosols. Included on NASA’s MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS instruments, this band provides well-established benefits. The geostationary ABI 0.47 µm band will provide nearly continuous daytime observations of dust, haze, smoke and clouds. The 0.47 µm band is more sensitive to aerosols / dust / smoke because it samples a part of the electromagnetic spectrum where clear-sky atmospheric scattering is important.
  37. GOES East ABI Full Disk B02 Hi-Res "Red" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND02
    The ‘Red’ Visible band – 0.64 µm – has the finest spatial resolution (0.5 km at the subsatellite point) of all ABI bands. Thus it is ideal to identify small-scale features such as river fogs and fog/clear air boundaries, or overshooting tops or cumulus clouds. It has also been used to document daytime snow and ice cover, diagnose low-level cloud-drift winds, assist with detection of volcanic ash and analysis of hurricanes and winter storms. The ‘Red’ Visible band is also essential for creation of “true color” imagery.
  38. GOES East ABI Full Disk B03 "Veggie"
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND03
    The 0.86 μm band (a reflective band) detects daytime clouds, fog, and aerosols and is used to compute the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Its nickname is the “veggie” or “vegetation” band. The 0.86 μm band can detect burn scars and thereby show land characteristics to determine fire and run-off potential. Vegetated land, in general, shows up brighter in this band than in visible bands. Landwater contrast is also large in this band.
  39. GOES East ABI Full Disk B04 Cirrus
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND04
    The Cirrus Band (1.37 µm) is unique among the reflective bands on the ABI in that it occupies a region of very strong absorption by water vapor in the electromagnetic spectrum. It will detect very thin cirrus clouds during the day.
  40. GOES East ABI Full Disk B05 Snow/Ice
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND05
    The Snow/Ice band takes advantage of the difference between the refraction components of water and ice at 1.61 µm. Liquid water clouds are bright in this channel; ice clouds are darker because ice absorbs (rather than reflects) radiation at 1.61 µm. Thus you can infer cloud phase. Fires can also be detected at night using this band.
  41. GOES East ABI Full Disk B06 Cloud Particle Size
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND06
    The 2.24 μm band, in conjunction with other bands, enables cloud particle size estimation. Cloud particle size changes can indicate cloud development. The 2.24 μm band is also used with other bands to estimate aerosol particle size (by characterizing the aerosol-free background over land), to create cloud masking and to detect hot spots.
  42. GOES East ABI Full Disk B07 "Fire"
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND07
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  43. GOES East ABI Full Disk B07 "Fire" enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND07-FIRE
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  44. GOES East ABI Full Disk B08 Upper-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND08
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  45. GOES East ABI Full Disk B08 Upper-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND08-VAPR
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  46. GOES East ABI Full Disk B09 Mid-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND09
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  47. GOES East ABI Full Disk B09 Mid-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND09-VAPR
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  48. GOES East ABI Full Disk B10 Lower-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND10
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  49. GOES East ABI Full Disk B10 Lower-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND10-VAPR
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  50. GOES East ABI Full Disk B11 Cloud Phase
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND11
    The infrared 8.5 μm band is a window channel; there is little atmospheric absorption of energy in clear skies at this wavelength (unless SO2 from a volcanic eruption is present). However, knowledge of emissivity is important in the interpretation of this Band: Differences in surface emissivity at 8.5 μm occur over different soil types, affecting the perceived brightness temperature. Water droplets also have different emissivity properties for 8.5 μm radiation compared to other wavelengths. The 8.5 μm band was not available on either the Legacy GOES Imager or GOES Sounder.
  51. GOES East ABI Full Disk B12 Ozone
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND12
    The 9.6 μm band gives information both day and night about the dynamics of the atmosphere near the tropopause. This band shows cooler temperatures than the clean window band because both ozone and water vapor absorb 9.6 μm atmospheric energy. The cooling effect is especially apparent at large zenith angles. This band alone cannot diagnose total column ozone: product generation using other bands will be necessary for that.
  52. GOES East ABI Full Disk B13 "Clean" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND13
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  53. GOES East ABI Full Disk B13 "Clean" Infrared enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND13-GRAD
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  54. GOES East ABI Full Disk B14 Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND14
    The infrared 11.2 μm band is a window channel; however, there is absorption of energy by water vapor at this wavelength. Brightness Temperatures (BTs) are affected by this absorption, and 11.2 μm BTs will be cooler than clean window (10.3 μm) BTs – by an amount that is a function of the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. This band has similarities to the legacy infrared channel at 10.7 μm.
  55. GOES East ABI Full Disk B15 "Dirty" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND15
    Absorption and re-emission of water vapor, particularly in the lower troposphere, slightly cools most non-cloud brightness temperatures (BTs) in the 12.3 μm band compared to the other infrared window channels: the more water vapor, the greater the BT difference. The 12.3 μm band and the 10.3 μm are used to compute the ‘split window difference’. The 10.3 μm “Clean Window” channel is a better choice than the “Dirty Window” (12.3 μm) for the monitoring of simple atmospheric phenomena.
  56. GOES East ABI Full Disk B16 Carbon Dioxide
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-BAND16
    Products derived using the infrared 13.3 μm “Carbon Dioxide” band can be used to delineate the tropopause, to estimate cloudtop heights, to discern the level of Derived Motion Winds, to supplement Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) sky observations and to identify Volcanic Ash. The 13.3 μm band is vital for Baseline Products; that is demonstrated by its presence on heritage GOES Imagers and Sounders. Despite its importance in products, the CO2 channel is typically not used for visual interpretation of weather events.
  57. GOES East ABI Full Disk True Color product
    ID: G16-ABI-FD-TC
    True Color Imagery gives an image that is approximately as you would see it from Outer Space. With ABI, the challenge of creating True Color arises from the the lack of a Green Band. The CIMSS Natural True Color product, approximates the green by combining Blue (0.47 µm), Red (0.64 µm) and ‘Veggie’ (0.86 µm) bands. The use of the Veggie band is important because it mimics the enhanced reflectivity present in the Green Band.
  58. GOES East ABI Meso1 B01 "Blue" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND01
    The 0.47 µm, or “Blue” visible band, is one of two visible bands on the ABI, and provides data for monitoring aerosols. Included on NASA’s MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS instruments, this band provides well-established benefits. The geostationary ABI 0.47 µm band will provide nearly continuous daytime observations of dust, haze, smoke and clouds. The 0.47 µm band is more sensitive to aerosols / dust / smoke because it samples a part of the electromagnetic spectrum where clear-sky atmospheric scattering is important.
  59. GOES East ABI Meso1 B02 Hi-Res "Red" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND02
    The ‘Red’ Visible band – 0.64 µm – has the finest spatial resolution (0.5 km at the subsatellite point) of all ABI bands. Thus it is ideal to identify small-scale features such as river fogs and fog/clear air boundaries, or overshooting tops or cumulus clouds. It has also been used to document daytime snow and ice cover, diagnose low-level cloud-drift winds, assist with detection of volcanic ash and analysis of hurricanes and winter storms. The ‘Red’ Visible band is also essential for creation of “true color” imagery.
  60. GOES East ABI Meso1 B03 "Veggie"
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND03
    The 0.86 μm band (a reflective band) detects daytime clouds, fog, and aerosols and is used to compute the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Its nickname is the “veggie” or “vegetation” band. The 0.86 μm band can detect burn scars and thereby show land characteristics to determine fire and run-off potential. Vegetated land, in general, shows up brighter in this band than in visible bands. Landwater contrast is also large in this band.
  61. GOES East ABI Meso1 B04 Cirrus
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND04
    The Cirrus Band (1.37 µm) is unique among the reflective bands on the ABI in that it occupies a region of very strong absorption by water vapor in the electromagnetic spectrum. It will detect very thin cirrus clouds during the day.
  62. GOES East ABI Meso1 B05 Snow/Ice
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND05
    The Snow/Ice band takes advantage of the difference between the refraction components of water and ice at 1.61 µm. Liquid water clouds are bright in this channel; ice clouds are darker because ice absorbs (rather than reflects) radiation at 1.61 µm. Thus you can infer cloud phase. Fires can also be detected at night using this band.
  63. GOES East ABI Meso1 B06 Cloud Particle Size
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND06
    The 2.24 μm band, in conjunction with other bands, enables cloud particle size estimation. Cloud particle size changes can indicate cloud development. The 2.24 μm band is also used with other bands to estimate aerosol particle size (by characterizing the aerosol-free background over land), to create cloud masking and to detect hot spots.
  64. GOES East ABI Meso1 B07 "Fire"
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND07
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  65. GOES East ABI Meso1 B07 "Fire" enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND07-FIRE
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  66. GOES East ABI Meso1 B08 Upper-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND08
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  67. GOES East ABI Meso1 B08 Upper-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND08-VAPR
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  68. GOES East ABI Meso1 B09 Mid-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND09
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  69. GOES East ABI Meso1 B09 Mid-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND09-VAPR
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  70. GOES East ABI Meso1 B10 Lower-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND10
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  71. GOES East ABI Meso1 B10 Lower-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND10-VAPR
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  72. GOES East ABI Meso1 B11 Cloud Phase
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND11
    The infrared 8.5 μm band is a window channel; there is little atmospheric absorption of energy in clear skies at this wavelength (unless SO2 from a volcanic eruption is present). However, knowledge of emissivity is important in the interpretation of this Band: Differences in surface emissivity at 8.5 μm occur over different soil types, affecting the perceived brightness temperature. Water droplets also have different emissivity properties for 8.5 μm radiation compared to other wavelengths. The 8.5 μm band was not available on either the Legacy GOES Imager or GOES Sounder.
  73. GOES East ABI Meso1 B12 Ozone
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND12
    The 9.6 μm band gives information both day and night about the dynamics of the atmosphere near the tropopause. This band shows cooler temperatures than the clean window band because both ozone and water vapor absorb 9.6 μm atmospheric energy. The cooling effect is especially apparent at large zenith angles. This band alone cannot diagnose total column ozone: product generation using other bands will be necessary for that.
  74. GOES East ABI Meso1 B13 "Clean" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND13
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  75. GOES East ABI Meso1 B13 "Clean" Infrared enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND13-GRAD
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  76. GOES East ABI Meso1 B13 (Red)
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND13-RED
    View of G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND13
  77. GOES East ABI Meso1 B14 Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND14
    The infrared 11.2 μm band is a window channel; however, there is absorption of energy by water vapor at this wavelength. Brightness Temperatures (BTs) are affected by this absorption, and 11.2 μm BTs will be cooler than clean window (10.3 μm) BTs – by an amount that is a function of the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. This band has similarities to the legacy infrared channel at 10.7 μm.
  78. GOES East ABI Meso1 B15 "Dirty" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND15
    Absorption and re-emission of water vapor, particularly in the lower troposphere, slightly cools most non-cloud brightness temperatures (BTs) in the 12.3 μm band compared to the other infrared window channels: the more water vapor, the greater the BT difference. The 12.3 μm band and the 10.3 μm are used to compute the ‘split window difference’. The 10.3 μm “Clean Window” channel is a better choice than the “Dirty Window” (12.3 μm) for the monitoring of simple atmospheric phenomena.
  79. GOES East ABI Meso1 B16 Carbon Dixoide
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO1-BAND16
    Products derived using the infrared 13.3 μm “Carbon Dioxide” band can be used to delineate the tropopause, to estimate cloudtop heights, to discern the level of Derived Motion Winds, to supplement Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) sky observations and to identify Volcanic Ash. The 13.3 μm band is vital for Baseline Products; that is demonstrated by its presence on heritage GOES Imagers and Sounders. Despite its importance in products, the CO2 channel is typically not used for visual interpretation of weather events.
  80. GOES East ABI Meso2 B01 "Blue" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND01
    The 0.47 µm, or “Blue” visible band, is one of two visible bands on the ABI, and provides data for monitoring aerosols. Included on NASA’s MODIS and Suomi NPP VIIRS instruments, this band provides well-established benefits. The geostationary ABI 0.47 µm band will provide nearly continuous daytime observations of dust, haze, smoke and clouds. The 0.47 µm band is more sensitive to aerosols / dust / smoke because it samples a part of the electromagnetic spectrum where clear-sky atmospheric scattering is important.
  81. GOES East ABI Meso2 B02 Hi-Res "Red" Visible
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND02
    The ‘Red’ Visible band – 0.64 µm – has the finest spatial resolution (0.5 km at the subsatellite point) of all ABI bands. Thus it is ideal to identify small-scale features such as river fogs and fog/clear air boundaries, or overshooting tops or cumulus clouds. It has also been used to document daytime snow and ice cover, diagnose low-level cloud-drift winds, assist with detection of volcanic ash and analysis of hurricanes and winter storms. The ‘Red’ Visible band is also essential for creation of “true color” imagery.
  82. GOES East ABI Meso2 B03 "Veggie"
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND03
    The 0.86 μm band (a reflective band) detects daytime clouds, fog, and aerosols and is used to compute the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI). Its nickname is the “veggie” or “vegetation” band. The 0.86 μm band can detect burn scars and thereby show land characteristics to determine fire and run-off potential. Vegetated land, in general, shows up brighter in this band than in visible bands. Landwater contrast is also large in this band.
  83. GOES East ABI Meso2 B04 Cirrus
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND04
    The Cirrus Band (1.37 µm) is unique among the reflective bands on the ABI in that it occupies a region of very strong absorption by water vapor in the electromagnetic spectrum. It will detect very thin cirrus clouds during the day.
  84. GOES East ABI Meso2 B05 Snow/Ice
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND05
    The Snow/Ice band takes advantage of the difference between the refraction components of water and ice at 1.61 µm. Liquid water clouds are bright in this channel; ice clouds are darker because ice absorbs (rather than reflects) radiation at 1.61 µm. Thus you can infer cloud phase. Fires can also be detected at night using this band.
  85. GOES East ABI Meso2 B06 Cloud Particle Size
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND06
    IThe 2.24 μm band, in conjunction with other bands, enables cloud particle size estimation. Cloud particle size changes can indicate cloud development. The 2.24 μm band is also used with other bands to estimate aerosol particle size (by characterizing the aerosol-free background over land), to create cloud masking and to detect hot spots.
  86. GOES East ABI Meso2 B07 "Fire"
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND07
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  87. GOES East ABI Meso2 B07 "Fire" enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND07-FIRE
    The 3.9 μm band can be used to identify fog and low clouds at night, identify fire hot spots, detect volcanic ash, estimate sea-surface temperatures, and discriminate between ice crystal sizes during the day. Low-level atmospheric vector winds can be estimated with this band, and the band can be used to study urban heat islands. The 3.9 μm is unique among ABI bands because it senses both emitted terrestrial radiation as well as significant reflected solar radiation during the day.
  88. GOES East ABI Meso2 B08 Upper-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND08
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  89. GOES East ABI Meso2 B08 Upper-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND08-VAPR
    The 6.2 µm “Upper-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking upper-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating upper/ mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where the potential for turbulence exists. Further, it can be used to validate numerical model initialization and warming/cooling with time can reveal vertical motions at mid- and upper levels.
  90. GOES East ABI Meso2 B09 Mid-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND09
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  91. GOES East ABI Meso2 B09 Mid-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND09-VAPR
    The 6.9 µm “Mid-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI, and is used for tracking middle-tropospheric winds, identifying jet streams, forecasting hurricane track and mid-latitude storm motion, monitoring severe weather potential, estimating mid-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles) and identifying regions where turbulence might exist. Surface features are usually not apparent in this band. Brightness Temperatures show cooling because of absorption of energy at 6.9 µm by water vapor.
  92. GOES East ABI Meso2 B10 Lower-level Water Vapor
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND10
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  93. GOES East ABI Meso2 B10 Lower-level Water Vapor enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND10-VAPR
    The 7.3 µm “Lower-level water vapor” band is one of three water vapor bands on the ABI. It typically senses farthest down into the midtroposphere in cloud-free regions, to around 500-750 hPa. It is used to track lowertropospheric winds, identify jet streaks, monitor severe weather potential, estimate lower-level moisture (for legacy vertical moisture profiles), identify regions where the potential for turbulence exists, highlight volcanic plumes that are rich in sulphur dioxide (SO2) and track LakeEffect snow bands.
  94. GOES East ABI Meso2 B11 Cloud Phase
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND11
    The infrared 8.5 μm band is a window channel; there is little atmospheric absorption of energy in clear skies at this wavelength (unless SO2 from a volcanic eruption is present). However, knowledge of emissivity is important in the interpretation of this Band: Differences in surface emissivity at 8.5 μm occur over different soil types, affecting the perceived brightness temperature. Water droplets also have different emissivity properties for 8.5 μm radiation compared to other wavelengths. The 8.5 μm band was not available on either the Legacy GOES Imager or GOES Sounder.
  95. GOES East ABI Meso2 B12 Ozone
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND12
    The 9.6 μm band gives information both day and night about the dynamics of the atmosphere near the tropopause. This band shows cooler temperatures than the clean window band because both ozone and water vapor absorb 9.6 μm atmospheric energy. The cooling effect is especially apparent at large zenith angles. This band alone cannot diagnose total column ozone: product generation using other bands will be necessary for that.
  96. GOES East ABI Meso2 B13 "Clean" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND13
    IThe 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  97. GOES East ABI Meso2 B13 "Clean" Infrared enhanced
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND13-GRAD
    The 10.3 μm “clean” infrared window band is less sensitive than other infrared window bands to water vapor absorption, and therefore improves atmospheric moisture corrections, aids in cloud and other atmospheric feature identification/classification, estimation of cloudtop brightness temperature and cloud particle size, and surface property characterization in derived products.
  98. GOES East ABI Meso2 B13 (Cyan)
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-B13-CYAN
    View of G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND13
  99. GOES East ABI Meso2 B14 Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND14
    The infrared 11.2 μm band is a window channel; however, there is absorption of energy by water vapor at this wavelength. Brightness Temperatures (BTs) are affected by this absorption, and 11.2 μm BTs will be cooler than clean window (10.3 μm) BTs – by an amount that is a function of the amount of moisture in the atmosphere. This band has similarities to the legacy infrared channel at 10.7 μm.
  100. GOES East ABI Meso2 B15 "Dirty" Infrared
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND15
    Absorption and re-emission of water vapor, particularly in the lower troposphere, slightly cools most non-cloud brightness temperatures (BTs) in the 12.3 μm band compared to the other infrared window channels: the more water vapor, the greater the BT difference. The 12.3 μm band and the 10.3 μm are used to compute the ‘split window difference’. The 10.3 μm “Clean Window” channel is a better choice than the “Dirty Window” (12.3 μm) for the monitoring of simple atmospheric phenomena.
  101. GOES East ABI Meso2 B16 Carbon Dioxide
    ID: G16-ABI-MESO2-BAND16
    Products derived using the infrared 13.3 μm “Carbon Dioxide” band can be used to delineate the tropopause, to estimate cloudtop heights, to discern the level of Derived Motion Winds, to supplement Automated Surface Observing System (ASOS) sky observations and to identify Volcanic Ash. The 13.3 μm band is vital for Baseline Products; that is demonstrated by its presence on heritage GOES Imagers and Sounders. Despite its importance in products, the CO2 channel is typically not used for visual interpretation of weather events.
  102. GOES East GLM Full Disk Group Density
    ID: glmgroupdensity
    The Geostationary Lightning Mapper, or GLM, on board Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite– R Series spacecraft, is the first operational lightning mapper flown in geostationary orbit. GLM detects the light emitted by lightning at the tops of clouds day and night and collects information such as the frequency, location and extent of lightning discharges. The instrument measures total lightning, both in-cloud and cloud-to-ground, to aid in forecasting developing severe storms and a wide range of high-impact environmental phenomena including hailstorms, microburst winds, tornadoes, hurricanes, ash oods, snowstorms and res.
  103. GOES IFR (Low) Probability
    ID: FLSgeolifr
    FLS: GOES Low IFR
  104. GOES IFR Probability
    ID: FLSgeoifr
    FLS: GOES IFR
  105. GOES Infrared
    ID: conusir
    ConUS Infrared 1km (15 min, GEO) In the infrared (IR) channel, the satellite senses energy as heat. The earth’s surface absorbs about half of the incoming solar energy. Clouds and the atmosphere absorb a much smaller amount. The earth’s surface, clouds, and the atmosphere then re-emit part of this absorbed solar energy as heat. The infrared channel senses this re-emitted radiation. A major advantage of the IR channel is that it can sense energy at night, so this imagery is available 24 hours a day. This is a disadvantage of the visible channel, which requires daylight and cannot "see" after dark.
  106. GOES Infrared 2byte
    ID: conusir2
    ConUS Infrared 4km - Temp
  107. GOES IR Aviation
    ID: conusiravn
    GOES IR Aviation
  108. GOES IR Dvorak
    ID: conusirbd
    GOES IR Dvorak
  109. GOES IR Funk Top
    ID: conusirfunk
    GOES IR Funk Top
  110. GOES IR Overshooting Tops
    ID: conusirott
    GOES IR Overshooting Tops
  111. GOES IR Rainbow
    ID: conusirnhc
    GOES IR Rainbow
  112. GOES Lifted Index
    ID: cimssdpilili
    GOES-DPI Lifted Index (Li et al. 2008)
  113. GOES Ozone
    ID: cimssdpiozli
    GOES-DPI Ozone (Li etal 2008)
  114. GOES Precipitable Water
    ID: cimssdpipwli
    CIMSS-DPI Precipitable Water (mm)
  115. GOES Visible
    ID: conusvis
    ConUS Visible 1km (15 min, GEO) Visible satellite imagery is produced when the satellite radiometer collects reflected energy in the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum. It is only available during daylight as it relies on reflected solar radiation. Highly reflective surfaces like clouds, snow cover, sea ice and desert sand show up as bright white. Bodies of water like lakes, rivers and oceans reflect less sunlight, appearing darker. Land surface, vegetated ground and soil display as dark gray.
  116. GOES West Full Disk IR
    ID: GOES-W-FD-IR
    GOES West Full Disk IR (Infrared)
  117. GOES West Full Disk LWIR
    ID: GOES-W-FD-LWIR
    GOES West Full Disk LWIR (Long Wave Infrared)
  118. GOES West Full Disk NIR
    ID: GOES-W-FD-NIR
    GOES West Full Disk NIR (Near Infrared)
  119. GOES West Full Disk VIS
    ID: GOES-W-FD-VIS
    GOES West Full Disk VIS (Visible)
  120. GOES West Full Disk WV
    ID: GOES-W-FD-WV
    GOES West Full Disk WV (Water Vapor)
  121. Hydro Estimator Rainfall
    ID: NESDIS-GHE-HourlyRainfall
    The HE algorithm uses infrared (IR) brightness temperatures to identify regions of rainfall and retrieve rainfall rate, while using National Centers for Environmental Prediction (NCEP) Global Forecast System (GFS) model fields to account for the effects of moisture availability, evaporation, orographic modulation, and thermodynamic profile effects. Estimates of rainfall from satellites can provide critical rainfall information in regions where data from gauges or radar are unavailable or unreliable, such as over oceans or sparsely populated regions.
  122. Icing Base Altitude
    ID: ICING-BASE
    ICING: ConUS Base Altitude (kft)
  123. Icing Threat Potential
    ID: ICING-THREAT
    ICING: ConUS Threat Potential (Cat)
  124. Icing Top Altitude
    ID: ICING-TOP
    ICING: ConUS Top Altitude (kft)
  125. IR Winds 250-100mb
    ID: AMV-ULhigh
    AMV: Upper Level IR/WV (100-250mb)
  126. IR Winds 350-251mb
    ID: AMV-ULmid
    AMV: Upper Level IR/WV (251-350mb)
  127. IR Winds 500-351mb
    ID: AMV-ULlow
    AMV: Upper Level IR/WV (351-500mb)
  128. IR Winds 599-400mb
    ID: AMV-LLhigh
    AMV: 400-599mb Low Level IR winds
  129. IR Winds 799-600mb
    ID: AMV-LLmid
    AMV: Lower Level IR (600-799mb)
  130. IR Winds 950-800mb
    ID: AMV-LLlow
    AMV: Lower Level IR (800-950mb)
  131. Night Fog IR/SWIR
    ID: conusfog
    Continental US Night Fog 4km - IR/SWIR Tdiff
  132. Vis Winds 800-700mb
    ID: AMV-VISmid
    AMV: Middle Level Visible (700-800mb)
  133. Vis Winds 925-801mb
    ID: AMV-VISlow
    AMV: Lower Level Visible (801-925mb)